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  • Sophomore Core Seminar

    Course Descriptions

     

    Common Core Seminar Description:
    CORE or Discipline Specific 279 CORE: What is the Common Good?  

    3 credits
    This is the second of three interdisciplinary courses that, together with the fourth-year capstone course in the major, comprise ODU‘s core seminars. All sections of this seminar listed below will extend the discussion of human nature in CORE 179 to address the question, 'What is the Common Good?' Students will examine the role of individuals belonging to multiple and increasingly diverse communities. Students will have the opportunity to translate knowledge into action through a community service component. While each section will approach the question of the seminar from a unique perspective, all sections share common learning outcomes and a common text or texts. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111.


    Section-Specific Descriptions:
    ART 279A CORE: Global Community in Art
     

    3 credits
    This course introduces students to the concept of art as an agent for social change through case studies of community/communal art 'movements' through history from around the globe as well as the United States and our local community. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111. This course fulfills the Arts requirement (Art/Music/Theatre).


    ART/HST/POL 279C CORE: American Political Thought: Nature and the Common Good  

    3 credits
    A study of the concept of nature as used in Anglo-American thought and how these usages influence an understanding of the natural, social, and political environments of the United States. Special emphasis given to American political theory, its illustration through the 19th century American landscape movement, and the inability of U.S. thinkers to appreciate the common good. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111. Not open to students with credit in POL/HST/ART-335 or POL-348F.


    BIO 279A CORE: Disease: Myth and Reality  

    3 credits
    What is the obligation of a person with an infectious disease to their community? This class will explore the different agents that cause infectious disease, modes of transmission, control of infections and public health measures. We will also look at the role infectious disease has played in the history of the western world from the bubonic plague in Europe, the smallpox epidemic among the Native Americans and the current AIDS epidemic. The current threat of the bird influenza will also be examined. This course will fulfill the Science requirement for non-science majors. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer credit. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111. Not open to students with credit in BIO 348B.


    BUS 279A CORE: Leadership and the Common Good  

    3 credits
    This course integrates readings in the humanities, experiential exercises, video analysis, and case studies in the service of helping students develop their own unique leadership philosophy. Engagement in the course will strengthen students‘ capacity to lead others. The transition from self-leadership to a consideration of community and the common good is explored. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111.

    CORE 279A CORE: Our Bridges and Borders  

    3 credits
    We will explore how we build bridges with people with whom we do not normally interact. We will explore ways to eliminate or expand borders in order to strengthen communities. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111. This course fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement.


    CRJ/POL 279A CORE: Environmental Values and Policymaking  

    3 credits
    This course explores how the 'common good' might be considered a way of judging government‘s actions with respect to the natural environment. Some environmentalists wonder if conventional thinking—even democracy itself—is up to the challenge. Course will illustrate real-world technical complexities and uncertainties, and the existence of competing worthy (and costly) common objectives besides environmental protection, stand in the way of any easy solutions to environmental problems. This course is necessarily interdisciplinary since neither nature nor policymaking is organized by academic departments. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG-102 or ENG 111. Not open to students with credit in CRJ/POL-258.

    CRJ/PJU 279G CORE: Interpersonal Negotiation and Mediation
    3 credits
    This course introduces basic and intermediate level skills useful for resolving interpersonal conflicts and reconciling relationships post trauma. Building on an understanding of conflict theory and communication, the course uses skills of active listening, problem-solving and bargaining in family, work and community conflicts. Emphasis will be placed on training through simulations and role-play. Particular attention will be focused on the areas of interest-based negotiation, principled mediation and victim-offender reconciliation. These topics will serve as the vehicle for addressing the question of the seminar: How shall we live in the world in the light of divine and social justice? Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status; ENG 102 or ENG 111. Not open to students with credit in PJU 230, CRJ 237, CRJ 379B, or PJU 379C. This course partially fulfills the Social and Behavioral Science requirement.


    ENG 279A CORE: Conflict and Community  

    3 credits
    How are communities—particularly the idea of the common good—affected by large-scale conflict? What happens to individuals and society when divergent or opposing definitions of the common good clash? This course seeks to explore answers to these questions through the lens of a particular major United States conflict (the Vietnam Way, for example). Using memoirs, novels, poems, and film—and by interviewing participants, veterans, and survivors of conflict—we will attempt to gain not only an understanding of the various communities affected by that conflict but also lasting insight into the effects of war and other social upheavals on the idea of the common good. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111. This course fulfills the Arts requirement (Literature).


    ENG 279B CORE: Home and Away: Epics and Utopias  

    3 credits
    An exploration of community and the common good based on some of the central epics in the western tradition—The Odyssey, Beowulf, and Paradise Lost—and renaissance and more recent utopias. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111. This course fulfills the Arts requirement (Literature).

    ENG 279C CORE: Uncovering Fairytales, Myths, Folktales, and Ghost Stories

    3 credits
    Dig deep into the oral culture of myth, fold and fairy tales and even the supernatural. This course explores the topic of the "common good" as it relates not only in these classical tales, but as it reflects in one's own personal folk or mythic journey. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or ENG 110-111; CORE 179 or appropriate transfer credit. This course fulfills the Arts requirement (Literature).

    ENG 279D CORE: Studies in Trauma Literature
    3 credits
    Collective memory is not simply the memories shared by a cultural group. Often associated with the Holocaust, this concept concerns the act of “bearing witness,” of acknowledging trauma in order to bring about social healing. This course will examine visual, written, and physical memorials to the Holocaust, September 11th, and other twentieth century tragedies. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or ENG 110-111; CORE 179 or appropriate transfer credit. This course fulfills the Arts requirement (Literature).


    ENV 279A CORE: Applied Sustainability  

    3 credits
    What is sustainability? How is it addressed across a range of disciplines? How can we understand how to live sustainably, in community from the local to global perspective? An integrated approach will apply understanding and advances in architecture, business, chemistry, biology, education, psychology, and ecology to living sustainability in community with others and the environment. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111. This course fulfills the science requirement for non-science majors. Not open to students with credit in ENV 230.

    HON 279B CORE: Critical Writing and Research  

    3 credits
    Research allows us to better understand the world around us (theoretical research) and to solve problems (applied research). In order to have these effects, research must be shared with the rest of the community – both within and beyond the discipline. Students will actively engage in critical thinking exercises intended to improve their abilities to develop testable hypotheses, meaningful critiques, and defendable arguments. This will be coupled with a focus on research skills that will result in the successful completion of an in-depth original project in a discipline of the student‘s choice. Students will learn how to share their feelings with the community through written, oral, and visual presentations. Students will also be asked to combine their interests in unique ways in order to appreciate the power of interdisciplinary approaches to research and how different research communities must learn to work together. Prerequisites: Admission to the Honors Program and ENG 102 or ENG 111. 


    HST 279A CORE: History of Western Monasticism  

    3 credits
    This seminar explores the history of monastic communities from their earliest development to the end of the Middle Ages. Particular attention will be paid to communal life in Judaism and early Christianity, the development of coenobitism in Egypt and Greece, the institutionalization of Western monasticism, ninth and twelfth-century reforms, and the rise of the mendicant orders in the twelfth and thirteenth century. Comparison will also be made to traditions of communal life in other World religions. Over the course of the seminar students will consider the paradox of the anti-social community, the pursuits of active and contemplative life, the practicalities of stability, recruitment and governance, and issues of liminality and marginalization. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111. This course fulfills the Arts requirement (History).


    HST/ART/POL 279C CORE: American Political Thought: Nature and the Common Good  

    3 credits
    A study of the concept of nature as used in Anglo-American thought and how these usages influence an understanding of the natural, social, and political environments of the United States. Special emphasis given to American political theory, its illustration through the 19th century American landscape movement, and the inability of U.S. thinkers to appreciate the common good. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111. Not open to students with credit in POL/HST/ART-335 or POL-348F.


    PHL 279A CORE: Ethical Issues of Sex and Marriage  

    3 credits
    An examination of ethical principles and their application to ethical issues of sex and marriage. Includes consideration of whether communities formed by sexual relationships and marriages promote the common good of larger communities. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111.


    PHL 279B CORE: Community of Living Things  

    3 credits
    An examination of the nature of living things and their interdependence. The course will include a discussion of the place of intelligent beings in the cosmos and the different orders of common good involved. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111.


    PJU/CRJ 279G CORE: Interpersonal Negotiation and Mediation

    3 credits
    This course introduces basic and intermediate level skills useful for resolving interpersonal conflicts and reconciling relationships post trauma. Building on an understanding of conflict theory and communication, the course uses skills of active listening, problem-solving and bargaining in family, work and community conflicts. Emphasis will be placed on training through simulations and role-play. Particular attention will be focused on the areas of interest-based negotiation, principled mediation and victim-offender reconciliation. These topics will serve as the vehicle for addressing the question of the seminar: How shall we live in the world in the light of divine and social justice? Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status; ENG 102 or ENG 111. Not open to students with credit in PJU 230, CRJ 237, CRJ 379B, or PJU 379C. This course partially fulfills the Social and Behavioral Science requirement.

    POL/CRJ 279A CORE: Environmental Values Policymaking  

    3 credits
    This course explores how the 'common good' might be considered a way of judging government‘s actions with respect to the natural environment. Some environmentalists wonder if conventional thinking—even democracy itself—is up to the challenge. Course will illustrate real-world technical complexities and uncertainties, and the existence of competing worthy (and costly) common objectives besides environmental protection, stand in the way of any easy solutions to environmental problems. This course is necessarily interdisciplinary since neither nature nor policymaking is organized by academic departments. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG-102 or ENG 111. Not open to students with credit in POL-258.


    POL 279B CORE: Political Philosophy and the Western Tradition  

    3 credits
    Consideration of past and present attempts to develop a comprehensive understanding of politics: Plato-Aquinas, Machiavelli-Hegel, Marx-present. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG-102 or ENG 111. Not open to students with credit in POL/PHL-348D.


    POL/ART/HST 279C CORE: American Political Thought and the Common Good  

    3 credits
    A study of the concept of nature as used in Anglo-American thought and how these usages influence an understanding of the natural, social, and political environments of the United States. Special emphasis given to American political theory, its illustration through the 19th century American landscape movement, and the inability of U.S. thinkers to appreciate the common good. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG-102 or ENG 111. Not open to students with credit in POL/HST/ART-335 or POL-348F.


    SOC 279B CORE: Nonviolent Social Change  

    3 credits
    The course addresses the philosophical and religious foundations, theory, history, and practice of nonviolence as a method of social change. The course will include study of some of the great nonviolent leaders such as Mahatma Gandhi, Dorothy Day, Cesar Chavez, and Martin Luther King, Jr. Building on a nonviolent foundation, the course explores strategies for social organizing, designing campaigns for social change, fundraising, coalition building, recruiting, marketing ideas, media relations, and empowering grassroots leadership. The class will explore common elements of successful social change movements throughout history including: labor, women‘s, human rights, poor people‘s, peace and environmental. In relation to social change, the course will address the question, 'What does it mean to belong to a community?' Students will work with diverse communities and have the opportunity to translate knowledge into action through a community service component focused on the common good. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111. Not open to students with credit in SOC 320 or SOC 322. This course partially fulfills the Social Behavioral Science requirement.


    SWK 279A CORE: Women’s Issues and the Common Good  

    3 credits
    Perspectives on selected policy issues affecting women nationally and internationally. Attention is given to the impact of history, the power of stereotypes, the family as an economic institution, institutionalized violence against women, and changing institutions. Prerequisites: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111. Not open to students with credit in SWK 250. This course partially fulfills the Social and Behavioral Science requirement and fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement.


    SWK 279B CORE: Politics of Aging  

    3 credits
    Political, economic, and ethical perspectives on selected policy issues affecting the aging population in the U.S. Policy issues include: economic resources and needs of the aging population, impact of the 'baby boom generation' on the current support structure, and elder abuse. Intergenerational equity is also analyzed. Emphasis is given to the broad implications of economic life for elderly persons, besides society‘s differential treatment of older adults as a group. Seminar participants will actively participate in a short-term community-building project to promote the common good. Prerequisites: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status and ENG 102 or ENG 111. This course partially fulfills the Social and Behavioral Science requirement. Not open to students with credit in SWK 275.


    THL 279A CORE: Catholic Church in the World  

    3 credits
    This course discusses and analyzes three trends that characterize the Catholic Church since the Second Vatican Council: Evangelization, Ecumenism, and Inter-religious Dialogue. The course includes meetings with representatives of organs of the Catholic Church and Catholics of different cultures and language groups living in the Columbus area; members of Christian churches and communities in dialogue with the Catholic Church who live in Columbus; and representatives of non-Christian religions living in Columbus. Prerequisites: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status and ENG 102 or ENG 111.


    WGS 279A CORE: Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies  

    3 credits
    This course explores the common good through gender, its history, representation, and relationship to culture, society, and art. What is the relationship between gender and society? How has gender been influenced by society and vice versa? We will examine the ways diverse communities have responded to these kinds of questions in the past. We will also examine the ways in which gender is represented, viewed, treated, and discussed today. Issues such as the women‘s suffrage; gender policies in religion, business, and education; and gender bias will be discussed. Readings will be multicultural and multidisciplinary. Films, the visual arts, and popular media will also be included. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111. This course fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement.