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These are the current course descriptions including any pre- and co-requisites.

ACT 210 - Accounting for Financial Decision Making
3 Credits
A study of basic concepts and fundamentals underlying the measurement, valuation, analysis and communication of financial accounting information to external users for decision making and problem solving. 

Co-requisites: CIS 107. 


ACT 220 - Accounting for Managerial Decision Making
3 Credits
A study of basic concepts and fundamentals underlying the planning, controlling and communicating of managerial accounting information to internal users for decision making and problem solving. 

Prerequisite: ACT 210 with a minimum grade of C-; or permission of instructor and division chairperson.


CIS 107 - Computer Applications
3 Credits
This course introduces computer literacy and electronic spreadsheets. Topics include computer systems, the Internet, functions and tools in electronic spreadsheets and their applications in business fields. 

Not open to students with credit for CIS 106, CIS 180, or CIS 203. Course will not apply to a major in Computer Information Systems.


CIS 234 - Database Management Systems
3 Credits
A study of relational database management concepts and features, including the creation, maintenance, and manipulation of database files using a current relational database management system. 

Not open to students with credit for CIS 204 and CIS 340.


ECN 201L - Economics for Managers
4 Credits
A study of microeconomics and its relevance to managerial decisions in for-profit and not-for-profit enterprises. Topics covered include—demand and supply analysis, production and cost analysis, market structure and firm behavior, profit analysis, pricing practices, economic analysis of capital projects, and legal and regulatory environment of business.


ECN 205L - Principles of Economics
4 Credits
A basic study of both branches of economics: microeconomics which studies the decision making behavior of individuals, firms, and other economic units; and macroeconomics which studies inflation, unemployment, economic growth, money supply, national income, and government economic policies. 

Not open to students with credit in ECN 101.


ECN 207 - Principles of Microeconomics
3 Credits
A basic study of the decision making behavior of individuals, households, firms, industries, and other economic units regarding resource allocation. Students will explore how markets function to coordinate the economic activities of different economic units. Topics include scarcity, opportunity cost, demand and supply, consumption, production, market structures, and profit maximization.


ECN 208 - Principles of Macroeconomics
3 Credits
A basic study of the overall economy including inflation, unemployment, economic growth, money supply, national income, and government economic policies. It emphasizes the important measures used to determine an economy’s performance and explores the potential impacts of macroeconomic policy.


ECN 260 - Financial Institutions & Markets
3 Credits
A study of the structure, regulation and management of financial markets and institutions. It adopts a historical and evolutionary perspective to emphasize how innovation, globalization, regulation and technology affect the financial environment. It covers monetary policy and the role of financial institutions and markets in the global economy. 

Prerequisite: ECN 205 or ECN 207-208. Not open to students with credit for ECN 360.


ECN 322 - Intermediate Macro Economics
3 Credits
A study of the concepts of economic aggregates and modern employment theory; the determinants and statistical measurement of national income, consumption, investment, saving and economic growth; the impact of fiscal policy and governmental actions. 

Prerequisite: ECN 205 or ECN 207-208. Not open to students with credit for ECN 220.


ECN 325 - Intermediate Micro Economics
3 Credits
A study of the roles of the price system as a mechanism for resource allocation and as a guide for price and output determination. It provides the tools for cost-benefit analysis vital to decision making in organizations. 

Prerequisite: ECN 205 or ECN 207-208. Not open to students with credit for ECN 225.


ECN 330 - Money, Credit & Banking
3 Credits
A study of the role of money and credit in economic activities, the functions of the Federal Reserve System and its monetary policy instruments used to influence employment, output and prices. This course will enable the students to become critical observers of the financial and monetary environments of the United States economy and its interaction with the world economy. 

Prerequisite: ECN 205 or ECN 207-208. Not open to students with credit for ECN 220.


ECN 340 - International Economics
3 Credits
Analysis of the principles and practices of foreign trade, mechanisms of international finance and balance of payments, survey of commercial treaties, world trade institutions and the forces of globalization. 

Prerequisite: ECN 205 or ECN 207-208. Not open to students with credit for ECN 240.


ECN 351 - Comparative Economic Systems
3 Credits
Examines the differences and similarities between various economic systems. Covers the economies of different countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. It also studies the problems of transition of socialist systems to market-based economies. 

Prerequisite: ECN 205 or ECN 207-208. Not open to students with credit for ECN 251.


ECN 355 - Public Finance
3 Credits
Economic analysis of public debt, expenditures and revenues. Examines the role of government, with particular attention to public goods theory, project evaluation using cost-benefit analysis, and taxation. Covers the economic basis of government programs such as social security and food stamps. Some sections may include a service-learning component. 

Prerequisite: ECN 205 or ECN 207-208. Not open to students with credit for ECN 255.


ECN 379A - CORE: Social & Economic Justice
3 Credits
This course is an empirical, critical, reflective study of social and economic justice pertaining to the problems of income inequality, inequitable distribution of income, denial of property rights, resource allocation, and the determination of “just price/just wage.” It is a reflection on poverty, its dynamics and remedies, and the just demands of the poor. 

Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status; ENG 102 or ENG 111. This course fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement.


ECN 420 - History of Economic Thought
3 Credits
A systematic study of the development of economic thought from the beginning of the classical tradition through Marxian socialism of the twentieth century with principal attention on modern developments including Keynesian and supply-side economics. 

Prerequisite: ECN 322 or 325. Not open to students with credit for ECN 320.


ECN 479 - CORE: Economic Analysis
3 Credits
This senior seminar examines truth by applying economic analysis to current issues and problems. It explores and develops perspectives on prevailing economic questions by collecting, analyzing, and interpreting economic data and information. The capstone continues the discussion in the previous course seminars through critical evaluation of economic relations within a global community. 

Prerequisites: Completion of junior core seminar and ECN 322 or 325.


ECN 1/2/3/485 - Special Topics
1-3 Credits
Study of a timely topic in economics. 


ECN 2/3/486 - Independent Study
1-3 Credits
Intensive individual work. Includes Honors Program research. 

Prerequisites: Consent of instructor, academic advisor, division chairperson.


FIN 325 - Managerial Finance
3 Credits
A study of the forms of business organization, the financial organization of business activities, and financial decision theory. 

Prerequisite: ACT 210 or ACT 205; ECN 205 or ECN 207-208; MTH 140.


IRM 303 - Project Management
3 Credits
This course is a study of the basic foundation, framework, and key components of project management. It covers methods for managing project scope, project cost, project evaluation and review, and project communication. It emphasizes the role of effective project management in the overall risk management strategies of various organizations. 

Prerequisite: IRM 210.


MTH 102 - Beginning Algebra
3 Credits
This basic course in algebra includes a review of pre-algebra skills (integers, fractions, and order of operations), then focuses on linear equations, proportions, Cartesian coordinates, graphing linear equations, verbal problems, exponents, direct and inverse variation, and summation. Emphasizes quantitative reasoning and highlights applications of mathematics in a variety of disciplines and daily life. Does not fulfill the mathematics requirement of the Core Curriculum. 

Not open to students with credit for MTH 100 or higher numbered MTH courses.


MTH 140 - Introduction to Statistics
3 Credits
An introduction to the basic concepts and computations used in statistical analysis as well as their application to problems in other disciplines, especially biology, business, education, and social sciences. Topics include the description of data graphically and numerically, the collection of data via samples and experiments, and the process of drawing inferences or conclusions from data.

The laboratory component of the course emphasizes conceptual understanding, interpretation of statistical quantities, and written/oral communication and will require the use of mathematical software. 

Prerequisite: MTH 102 or placement.


MTH 240 - Calculus I
4 Credits
Topics include relations and functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, Mean Value Theorem, extrema, curve sketching, related rates, differentiation of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, introduction to Integral Calculus, the fundamental theorems of Calculus, elementary methods of integration, and applications.

The laboratory component of the course emphasizes mathematical modeling, problem solving, and written/oral communication and will require the use of graphing calculators and mathematical software. 

Prerequisite: MTH 160 or placement.