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  • English Language and Literature

    Course Descriptions


    ENG 100a Basic Composition for International Students  

    3 credits
    A course in basic composition designed for international students who have completed ESL 131. Students will improve their understanding of theme, development, critical reading, and English grammar. Students who have earned a B or better in ESL 131 may request exemption from ENG 100a from the chairperson of the Language Division. This course does not fulfill composition or literature requirements. When taken, this course must be completed prior to ENG 101 or ENG 110.


    ENG 100 College Reading and Writing Strategies  

    3 credits
    This course provides instruction in specific reading and composition strategies. A practicum approach to reading efficiency and effectiveness will prepare students to comprehend and retain college-level reading. A practicum approach to writing (including sentence structure, writing patterns, and the revision process) will provide students with skills necessary for satisfactory completion of typical college writing assignments. This course does not fulfill the composition requirements of the Core. This course does not fulfill the literature requirement of the Core. When taken, this course must be completed prior to ENG 110. Not open to students with credit for ENG 100B and ENG 100C.


    ENG 101L Thinking and Writing Across the Curriculum  

    4 credits
    This course emphasizes the strategies students need for writing and thinking across the curriculum. By practicing writing strategies such as argumentation, researched writing (or writing with sources), summary, analysis, comparison and contrast, definition, students will build the skills needed to succeed as college writers. Each section will focus on a specific theme. Themes from previous classes have included the following: American identity, family, love, the politics of food, Native American culture, and biography. This course does not fulfill the literature requirement. Not open to students with credit for ENG 101 or ENG 110.


    ENG 102L Scholarly Adventures: Researched Writing  

    4 credits
    Building upon the research skills from ENG 101, this course focuses primarily on academic research writing. Intensive reading and writing will be used to develop knowledge of analytical techniques in the liberal arts. There will be specific emphasis on reading strategies, library research, integrating sources, argumentation, and the MLA method of documentation. Each section will focus on a specific theme. Themes from previous classes have included the following: American identity, family, love, the politics of food, Native American culture, and biography. This course does not fulfill the literature requirement. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or 110. Not open to students with credit for ENG 111.

     
    ENG 110 College Writing I  

    3 credits
    This course emphasizes the strategies students need for writing and thinking across the curriculum. By practicing writing strategies such as argumentation, researched writing (or writing with sources), summary, analysis, comparison and contrast, definition, students will build the skills needed to succeed as college writers. Each section will focus on a specific theme. Themes from previous classes have included the following: American identity, family, love, the politics of food, Native American culture, and biography. This course does not fulfill the literature requirement for the Core. Not open to students with credit for ENG 101.


    ENG 111 College Writing II  

    3 credits
    Building upon the research skills from ENG 110, this course focuses primarily on academic research writing. Intensive reading and writing will be used to develop knowledge of analytical techniques in the liberal arts. There will be specific emphasis on reading strategies, library research, integrating sources, argumentation, and the MLA method of documentation. Each section will focus on a specific theme. Themes from previous classes have included the following: American identity, family, love, the politics of food, Native American culture, and biography. This course does not fulfill the literature requirement of the Core. Prerequisite: ENG 101 or 110. Not open to students with credit for ENG 102.

    ENG 205 Literary Research Methods
    3 credits
    The course provides an introduction to literary research methods, bibliography, literary terminology, and research writing. Students will learn to use the major research tools (online databases, search engines, and in-house library resources) in literary studies and apply the skills to selected literary works. Students will also learn how to find and analyze primary and secondary sources and incorporate findings into their writing. The course is designed to prepare students for research assignments in future English courses. 


    ENG 213 Literary Discourse  

    3 credits
    This course focuses on the various modes and methods of reading essential to the discipline of English. Students will gain an understanding of the terminology appropriate to a wide range of critical approaches: formalist, historicist, reader-response, and feminist, among others. Special attention will be given to the close reading of a variety of genres, a valuable skill with broad and interdisciplinary applications. Recommended for English majors. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.

    ENG 214 Introduction to Literature 

    3 credits
    This course is an introduction to literature which offers students the opportunity to read and appreciate a wide variety of poetry, fiction, and drama. Students will work on polishing their writing and oral communication skills as they learn about literary genres. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. 


    ENG 215A Survey of British Literature I
    3 credits
    Surveys predominantly the traditional, canonical writers of England of the Anglo-Saxon period, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Enlightenment. The course emphasizes historical and cultural influences on writers such as the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Spenser, Milton, Pope, Swift, and Samuel Johnson. The history of English—its dialects and levels of usage—is also covered. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.


    ENG 215B Survey of British Literature II  

    3 credits
    Surveys the major writers of England from the Romantic and Victorian periods and through the twentieth century. The course emphasizes historical and cultural influences on writers such as Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, George Eliot, Arnold, Browning, Joyce, Eliot, and Woolf. The history of English—its dialects and levels of usage—is also covered. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.

     
    ENG 216 Survey of American Literature  

    3 credits
    Surveys the major writers of the United States from colonial times through the twentieth century. The course emphasizes historical and cultural influences on writers such as Emerson, Whitman, Melville, Twain, and Faulkner. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.


    ENG 220 Professional Writing  

    3 credits
    A study of the various forms of business and technical writing: resumes, correspondence, proposals, case studies, and reports. Especially useful for liberal arts majors who want to make themselves more marketable in their careers and for those interested in professional writing. Grammar and language acquisition emphasized. Non-print media also included. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. Not open to students with credit in BUS 120. This course does not fulfill the literature requirement.


    ENG 279A CORE: Conflict and Community  

    3 credits
    How are communities—particularly the idea of the common good—affected by large-scale conflict? What happens to individuals and society when divergent or opposing definitions of the common good clash? This course seeks to explore answers to these questions through the lens of a particular major United States conflict (the Vietnam Way, for example). Using memoirs, novels, poems, and film—and by interviewing participants, veterans, and survivors of conflict—we will attempt to gain not only an understanding of the various communities affected by that conflict but also lasting insight into the effects of war and other social upheavals on the idea of the common good. Prerequisites: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111. This course fulfills the Arts requirement (Literature).


    ENG 279B CORE: Home and Away: Epics and Utopias  

    3 credits
    An exploration of community and the common good based on some of the central epics in the western tradition—The Odyssey, Beowulf, and Paradise Lost—and renaissance and more recent utopias. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111. This course fulfills the Arts requirement (Literature).

    ENG 279C CORE: Uncovering Fairytales, Myth, Folktales, and Ghost Stories 

    3 credits
    Dig deep into the oral culture of myth, fold and fairy tales and even the supernatural. This course explores the topic of the "common good" as it relates not only in these classical tales, but as it reflects in one's own personal folk or mythic journey. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or ENG 110-111; CORE 179 or appropriate transfer credit. This course fulfills the Arts requirement (Literature).

    ENG 279D CORE: Studies in Trauma Literature
    3 credits
    Collective memory is not simply the memories shared by a cultural group. Often associated with the Holocaust, this concept concerns the act of “bearing witness,” of acknowledging trauma in order to bring about social healing. This course will examine visual, written, and physical memorials to the Holocaust, September 11th, and other twentieth century tragedies. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or ENG 110-111; CORE 179 or appropriate transfer credit. This course fulfills the Arts requirement (Literature).

    ENG 322 Creative Writing  

    3 credits
    This course focuses on the means of presentation, production, and publication methods and options for writers. Grammar and language acquisition emphasized. Non-print media also included. Does not fulfill the literature requirement. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111 or consent of instructor.

     
    ENG 326 Advanced Critical Writing  

    3 credits
    This course provides extensive opportunities for experienced writers to develop advanced stylistic techniques essential to good writing. The focus ranges from microscopic (nuances in grammar) to macroscopic (writing theory), as well as the means by which we read and write for different purposes. Non-print media also included. Recommended for those interested in professional writing, teaching, and especially for the English major planning graduate study. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. Does not fulfill the literature requirement.


    ENG 330 Major Authors  

    3 credits
    This course offers an in-depth examination of a single author, or auteur, whose life and works comprise an important contribution to the field of literature. The focus of a particular course will be reflected in the title. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. May be repeated for up to six credits on different authors.


    ENG 342 African Literature  

    3 credits
    A general survey of African literature including the oral traditions that formed its background. Students will examine various forms of African artistic expression including oral literature, short story, and novels. Students will read literary texts originally written in English or in English
    translation. Reading of primary texts will be supplemented with critical essays and documentary films. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. This course fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement.


    ENG 343 The Literature of American Diversity  

    3 credits
    A study of literary works and authors not usually included in the traditional canon because of race, ethnic background, gender, age, or other factors. The class includes works by the minority cultures of African-American, Native American, Asian-American, and Hispanic-American as well as other groups left outside the mainstream of the American experience. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. This course fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement.


    ENG 344 Nineteenth-Century American Fiction  

    3 credits
    By reading authors such as Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, and Whitman, students will study what is often called 'the American Renaissance'. In addition, understanding of romanticism, realism, and other major literary trends of the time, will be developed, discussed, and analyzed. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111; ENG 346.


    ENG 346 Twentieth-Century American Literature  

    3 credits
    A representative study of the poetry, drama, and fiction of the United States since 1900. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.


    ENG 348A The Epic Tradition  

    3 credits
    A study of the tradition, form, and content of the epic from Homer to Milton. Emphasizes the role of the hero and deals with issues such as war, nature, human progress or regress, and theodicy. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.


    ENG 348C Studies in the Biographic Arts  

    3 credits
    An examination of the various biographies and autobiographies, paying close attention to the characteristics of the biography as a genre, the various permutations throughout history, and its often complex relationship to fiction. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.


    ENG 348D Women in Literature and Psychology  

    3 credits
    A study of the psychological treatment and images of women in literature and of psychological theories relevant to women. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or ENG 110-111. This course fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement.


    ENG 348G Film and Literature  

    3 credits
    By reading and analyzing literature in relationship to film, filmic techniques, and film's history, this course will explore the often complex and frequently competitive relationship between film and literature. Students analyze print and non-print materials, while also creating print and non-print projects. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.


    ENG 351 Studies in Romanticism  

    3 credits
    Students will study how the Romantic writers in England and the United States contributed to new ways of thinking about nature, the individual, God, art and other issues. Includes such writers as Wordsworth, Keats, Coleridge, Shelley, Byron, Emerson, Thoreau, Irving, Hawthorne, and Poe. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.


    ENG 352 Studies in Victorian Literature  

    3 credits
    This class explores how Victorian writers reacted to a time of industrialization, profound changes in science (evolution, for instance), social upheaval, religious doubt, and views of art, and how these issues relate to the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Authors typically covered include Dickens, the Bronte sisters, Thackeray, Gaskell, Tennyson, Arnold, Browning, Newman, Trollope, and Wilde. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.

     
    ENG 353 Twentieth-Century British Literature  

    3 credits
    A study of the literature of Modernism and its aftermath, focusing on the poetry, drama, and fiction of Great Britain since 1900. Authors will include such figures as Joyce, Woolf, Eliot, Conrad, and Beckett. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.

     
    ENG 357 World Literature  

    3 credits

    A study of selected masterpieces, in English translation, by international authors whose native language is not English. There will be an exploration of interplay between English-language and other language literatures, discussion of the place of translation, analysis of universal motifs, and exposure to authors not widely read in the United States. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. This course fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement.


    ENG 379A CORE: Feast and Famine: Class and Culture in Literature and Film  

    3 credits
    This course examines the question of justice by examining the haves and have-nots in literature and film. Issues revolving around race, class, and gender will be raised through the analysis of a variety of literary genres and films. This course fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement and the Arts requirement (Literature). Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer credit; ENG 102 or ENG 111.


    ENG 379B CORE: Rebels in Literature and Music  

    3 credits
    This course examines rebellion in literature (in fiction and non-fiction) and music (for example rock and roll, its roots in blues and gospel, and influences on alternative and rap) as social, personal, and political defiance of authority in order to advance principles of justice regarding the individual as related to community and the divine. Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer credit; ENG 102 or ENG 111.

    ENG 450 Studies in the Novel  

    3 credits
    A study in the forms, techniques, and historical evolution of the novel through the discussion of a particular theme, author, group of authors, or literary movement. A particular course‘s focus will be reflected in its title when it is offered. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. May be repeated up to six credits on different topics.


    ENG 451 Studies in Women's Literature  

    3 credits

    Explores the roles women have played in the history of literature and explores the contributions of female artists. The course also addresses issues of empowerment, marginalization, and voice. Some sections may include a service-learning component. Prerequisites: ENG-101-102 or 110-111.


    ENG 452 Studies in the Short Story  

    3 credits
    A study in the forms, techniques, and historical evolution of the short story as a literary genre through the discussion of authors, themes, and literary movements. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.


    ENG 455 Studies in Poetry  

    3 credits
    A study in the forms, techniques, and historical evolution of poetry through the discussion of a particular theme, author, group of authors, or literary movement. The course‘s focus will be reflected in the course titles in the course offering bulletins. Prerequisites: ENG 110-111 or 101-102. May be repeated up to six credits on different topics.

     
    ENG 456 Studies in Drama  

    3 credits
    A study in the forms techniques and historical evolution of drama through the discussion of a particular theme, author, group of authors, or literary movement. The course‘s focus will be reflected in the course titles in the course offering bulletins. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. May be repeated up to six credits on different topics.


    ENG 460 The Age of Chaucer  

    3 credits
    A study of Chaucer and other major writers of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111; ENG 205 or permission of instructor.


    ENG 463 The Age of Shakespeare  

    3 credits
    A study of the major works of Shakespeare and other dramatists from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. This course will focus on various genres. Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111; ENG 205 or permission of instructor.


    ENG 479 CORE: Literature Theory/Practice  

    3 credits
    This course offers students the opportunity to develop their professional, career, writing, and analytic skills through a variety of assignments. Students will not only read great works of literature, they will also learn about career development and the world of literary theory in order to better prepare them for the more advanced research activities of graduate and professional schools. The course is organized around issues regarding literature and the acquisition of knowledge. How do we know what we know? What is art? Who determines the canon and/or a great work of art? What is literary theory and interpretation? And, importantly, how have these questions been answered differently throughout the ages. The literature readings have been chosen to illustrate the close relationship, rather than the divisions, between literature and theory. In the end, the course asks students to 1) determine the truths they have learned about literature, and 2) examine how they know or came to know these truths. Prerequisites: Completion of junior core seminar, junior status, or permission of instructor; ENG 205.

     
    ENG 1/2/3/485 Special Topics  

    1-3 credits

    Advanced courses on writers or subjects of special significance or interest to groups of students or faculty.


    ENG 2/3/486 Independent Study  

    3 credits
    This class gives students the chance to develop individual creative, critical, and research projects. Includes Honors Program research. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor, academic advisor, division chairperson.


    ENG 497 Internship  

    3 credits
    Supervised fieldwork of 160 hours in creative writing, professional writing, or other activities in English language and literature. Students will be expected to meet regularly with the division chairperson. Prerequisites: junior standing, 3.000 average in major, consent of instructor, academic advisor, and division chairperson; successful completion of application requirements for internship.