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Keep your education on track by taking a summer course or two at ODU. We offer undergraduate and graduate courses with flexibility that fits your schedule.
Program Highlights
  • ODU's summer sessions are two, three, four or eight weeks long.
  • Choose from on campus and online classes, or independent study.
  • Sessions begin in May, June and July.

How to Apply

Current students New undergraduate students  New graduate students 
Register at ODUonline
Apply online

Questions? Contact the Office of Admission at (614) 251-4500.
Apply online

Questions? Contact the Office of Graduate Admissions at (614) 251-4615.
Deadlines
Undergraduate Courses For May start dates: May 18
For June start dates: June 10
Graduate Courses Priority: April 27
Rolling: June 1
View full Academic Calendar  

Undergraduate Courses 

  • Art
    ART 100 - Studio Humanities
    3 credits, Undergraduate

    An introduction to the creative process through visual art studio experience. Emphasis is on materials exploration and the variety of media considered "fine art," as well as the development of critical thinking skills involved in art production. Fee. Studio Course.
    • June 10 - July 29
    • 6 - 9:30 p.m., Wednesday
    • Main Campus


    ART 156 - Ceramics
    3 credits, Undergraduate

    A general introduction to studio ceramics. Emphasis is placed on acquisition of hand building techniques, ceramic design concepts, development of individual design criteria, glaze experi- mentation, fundamental types of cermamic ware and kiln procedures. Fee. Studio course.
    • June 9 - July 28
    • 6 - 9:30 p.m., Wednesday
    • Main Campus
  • Biology
    Bio 202 - Botany / Zoology / Ecology
    4 Credits, Undergraduate

    A survey of botany, zoology, and ecology; this lab based course will introduce students to current scientific research in these fields. Moving from basic understandings, students will begin to practice botany and ecology in an applied manner and learn to clearly communicate the results of that work, laboratory included.
    • June 9 - July 23
    • 12 noon – 3:50 p.m., Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
    • Main Campus



    BIO 247 - Medical Terminology I
    1 Credit, Undergraduate

    A two-class sequence in terminology pertaining to modern medicine, current disease and treatment of disease, and other allied health areas.

    Prerequisites: BIO 201 and BIO 203.
    • May 20 - July 2
    • Online



    BIO 248 - Medical Terminology II

    1 Credit, Undergraduate

    Second class in a two-class sequence in terminology pertaining to modern medicine, current disease and treatment of disease, and other allied health areas.

    Prerequisites: BIO 201 and 203. 
    • May 20 - July 2
    • Online



    Bio 279A CORE - Disease: Myth & Reality
    3 Credits, Undergraduate


    What is the obligation of a person with an infectious disease to their community? This class will explore the different agents that cause infectious disease, modes of transmission, control of infections and public health measures. We will also look at the role infectious disease has played in the history of the western world from the bubonic plague in Europe, the smallpox epidemic among the Native Americans and the current AIDS epidemic. This course will fulfill the Science requirement for non-science majors.

    Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer credit. Pre- or Co-requisite: ENG 102 or ENG 111. Not open to students with credit in BIO 348B.
    • May 20 - July 2
    • 8 – 10:50 a.m., Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
    • Main Campus
  • Business Administration
    MBA 510 - Management Skills Portfolio
    3 Credits, Undergraduate/Graduate

    This is an integrated course focusing on personal skill and management competency assessment and development. This course utilizes a set of assessment instruments and techniques to help students identify areas for personal development and growth. The assessment process culminates in the creation of a personal development plan that will be revisited in the final course of each graduate business program in order to determine progress and recast an updated plan.

    Additionally, the course contains multiple skill modules addressing capabilities relevant to academic success in any business graduate program. Skills addressed include team, writing, creativity research, presentations, project management, software, and citation skills. Not open to students who have completed BUS 510.
    • June 5 - August 1
    • Online


    MBA 540 - Management of Information Systems
    3 Credits, Undergraduate/Graduate

    This course examines the use of information systems and their impact on service business processes. The course covers the management of the flow of information and services across the information the information systems user-producer interface. The course looks at the users of information systems and at the producers of information systems. The course approaches such topics as systems development, assessment of systems performance, and discussion of trends in the corporate application of developing technology from a managerial perspective. Not open to students who have completed BUS 545.
    • June 5 - August 1
    • Online


    MBA 550 - Global Business Enterprises & Trade Issues
    3 Credits, Undergraduate/Graduate

    This course addresses important issues pertaining to cross-border operations and practices of multi-national enterprises as well as trade issues between nation states. Cultural, political, environmental, fair labor practices, regional integration and trade restrictions issues all impinge upon management decisions. This course integrates basic trade theories underpinning multinational business with case studies that illustrate real world applicability of these theories and making them more transparent to the students. It also incorporates the ethical dilemma and the social responsibility concerns faced by multinational corporations in their international operations. Not open to students who have completed BUS 660.
    • June 5 - August 1
    • Online


    MBA 570 - Quantitative Business Analysis
    3 Credits, Undergraduate/Graduate

    This course deals with rational applications to decision making through the study of quantitative models. It emphasizes analysis of data, interpretation of model results, and their implications for managerial decisions. Topics include decision analysis, probability relations and distributions, regression models and forecasting, project analysis, queuing, and linear programming. Not open to students who have completed BUS 570.
    • June 8 - July 27
    • 6 - 9 p.m., Monday
    • Main Campus
  • Chemistry
    CHM 229 - Organic Chemistry I
    4 Credits, Undergraduate


    A study of the fundamental theory and laboratory techniques of organic chemistry. Topics include reactions of functional groups, reaction theory, and stereochemistry.

    Prerequisite: CHM 110. Corequisite: BIO 201. 
    • June 8 - July 2
    • 8 a.m. – 1:50 p.m., Monday through Friday
    • Main Campus



    CHM 230 - Organic Chemistry II
    4 Credits, Undergraduate

    A continuation of Organic Chemistry I. Topics include reactions of functional groups, spectroscopy, and polymer chemistry; includes laboratory.

    Prerequisite: CHM 229.
    • July 6 - July 31            
    • 8 a.m. – 1:50 p.m., Monday through Friday
    • Main Campus
  • Communication Studies
    COM 105 - Public Speaking
    3 Credits, Undergraduate


    A study of the principles and processes of oral communication with emphasis on speech design and delivery. Vocal and linguistic skills will be practiced. Critical thought will be developed through analysis of current and historical speeches.
    • June 9 - July 30
    • 6 - 9 p.m., Tuesday, Thursday
    • Main Campus
  • Education
    EDU 120 - Teaching Reading Through Literature for Children & Young Adults
    3 Credits, Undergraduate


    The techniques and methods of teaching reading through the use of literature for pre-school age through young adulthood will be explored. Emphasis is on genres, author and illustrator studies, interrelationship of reading, writing, listening and speaking, multicultural and international publications, and historical and contemporary publishing trends. Students should develop an appreciation for children's literature as they select, interpret, discuss, and formulate strategies for using quality books with children. Includes service-learning hours.
    • June 1 - July 24
    • 9 a.m - 12 noon, Monday
    • Main Campus


    EDU 211 - Teaching Phonics / Structure of Language
    3 Credits, Undergraduate


    A study of the phonology, morphology, syntax, semantic and pragmatic underpinnings of English and of the instructional strategies that support language acquisition and literacy.

    Prerequisite: EDU 102, 105, 110, 112, or equivalent.
    • May 18 - June 13
    • Online


    EDU 230 - Introduction to Special Education & Diverse Learners
    3 Credits, Undergraduate


    A survey of areas of exceptionality and related topics: learning disabilities, hearing, visual, and orthopedic impairments, behavior, emotional and communication disorders, development disabilities, multiple disabilities, early intervention, transition, giftedness, cultural diversity, parenting, inclusion, legal and ethical issues, implications for educational planning based on individual abilities and needs. Includes field experience for 20 hours.

    Prerequisite/Co-requisite: EDU 103, 105, 110 or equivalent.
    • June 1 - July 24
    • Online


    EDU 334 - Teaching Mathematics & Science in the Intermediate Grades 
    3 Credits, Undergraduate


    The purpose of this course is to familiarize early childhood teacher candidates with mathematics and science curricula for children in grades four and five and with instructional techniques appropriate for the delivery of the curricula. Course content is closely aligned with recommendations of authorities and national organizations, with a solid foundation in the Ohio Academic Content Standards for Mathematics and Science.

    The course is designed to extend the teacher candidate's understandings of mathematics and science content and methodology so that mathematics and science instruction is seen in terms of active children,making appropriate use of technology in learning mathematics and science as a relevant and coherent bodies of knowledge that relate to diverse cultures.

    Prerequisite: Admission to the Education Division. (Equivalent to EDU 566).
    • June 1 - July 24
    • Online


    EDU 336 - Teaching & Learning in the Intermediate Grades 
    3 Credits, Undergraduate


    The purpose of this course is to familiarize teacher candidates with the developmental needs of the intermediate age group, the organizational structures of the elementary/middle grades, and standards set by the National Middle School Association. Focus is placed on understanding the diversity of the students and ways of supporting the students through current research and best practices.

    Prerequisite: Admission to the Education Division.
    • June 1 - July 24
    • Online


    EDU 337 - Teaching Language Arts & Social Studies in the Intermediate Grades 
    3 Credits, Undergraduate


    The focus of this course is to explore the integration of the language arts and social studies particularly the content standards related to 4th and 6th grades. Topics include both the Ohio Content Standards for Language Arts and Social Studies (including topics specific to Ohio) as well as national students standards including those from the national standards including those from the National Council for the Social Studies and the National Council of Teachers of English. Emphasis will be on effective pedagogy for engaged teaching and learning.

    Prequisites: Declared Early Childhood Education major or continuing education student with Early Childhood license. (Equivalent to EDU 567).
    • June 1 - July 24
    • Online
  • English
    ENG 111 - College Writing II
    3 Credits, Undergraduate


    Building upon the research skills from ENG 110, this course focuses primarily on academic research writing. Intensive reading and writing will be used to develop knowledge of analytical techniques in the liberal arts. There will be specific emphasis on reading strategies, library research, integrating sources, argumentation, and the MLA method of documentation. Each section will focus on a specific theme. Themes from previous classes have included the following: American identity, family, love, the politics of food, Native American culture, and biography. This course does not fulfill the literature requirement of the Core.

    Prerequisite: ENG 101 or 110. Not open to students with credit for ENG 102.
    • June 8 - July 29
    • 12 noon - 3 p.m., Monday, Wednesday
    • Main Campus


    ENG 214 - Introduction to Literature
    3 Credits, Undergraduate


    This course is an introduction to literature which offers students the opportunity to read and appreciate a wide variety of poetry, fiction, and drama. Students will work on polishing their writing and oral communication skills as they learn about literary genres.

    Prerequisites: ENG 101-102, or ENG 110-111.
    • June 8 - July 29
    • 6 - 9 p.m., Monday, Wednesday
    • Main Campus
  • Environmental Science
    ENV 330 - Ichthyology: Natural History of Fish
    4 Credits, Undergraduate


    An introduction to fish, a very important and familiar group of living organisms. Examines fish diversity, adaptations, and ecology. The social and economic importance of fish in modern society will also be touched upon, especially as these relate to conservation and management of populations. Included laboratory will involve hands-on fish capturing and identification.

    Prerequisites: BIO 107 or 201.
    • Jun 9 - July 23
    • 8 - 11:50 a.m., Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
    • Main Campus
  • History
    HST 106 - World History I
    3 credits, Undergraduate

    A study of World history from the dawn of civilization to the early modern period. Areas of focus include the Near East, China, India, Japan, sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and the Americas. This course fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement.
    • June 9 - July 30
    • 12 noon - 2 p.m., Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
    • Main Campus
  • Latin
    LAT 185A - Special Topic: Intensive Basic Latin
    3 credits, Undergraduate

    A special topics course in fundamentals of Latin grammar and syntax, with emphasis on vocabulary and the development of reading skills for classical and ecclesiastical writing.s This course fulfills language requirements. 
    • June 9 - July 30
    • 2 - 4 p.m., Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
    • Main Campus
  • Math
    MTH 140 - Introduction to Probability &  Stats
    3 Credits, Undergraduate


    An introduction to the basic concepts and computations used in statistical analysis as well as their application to problems in other disciplines, especially biology, business, education, and social sciences. Topics include the description of data graphically and numerically, the collection of data via samples and experiments, and the process of drawing inferences or conclusions from data. The laboratory component of the course emphasizes conceptual understanding, interpretation of statistical quantities, and written/oral communication and will require the use of mathematical software.

    Prerequisite: MTH 102 or placement.
    • June 9 - July 7
    • 12 noon – 4 p.m., Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
    • Main Campus



    MTH 240 - Calculus I
    4 Credits, Undergraduate


    Topics include relations and functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, Mean Value Theorem, extrema, curve sketching, related rates, differentiation of exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, introduction to Integral Calculus, the fundamental theorems of Calculus, elementary methods of integration, and applications. The laboratory component of the course emphasizes mathematical modeling, problem solving, and written/oral communication and will require the use of graphing calculators and mathematical software.

    Prerequisite: MTH 160 or placement.
    • May 18 - June 27
    • Online



    MTH 241 - Calculus II
    4 Credits, Undergraduate


    Topics include a continuation of Integral Calculus, integration techniques, integration of exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, inverse trigonometric, and hyperbolic functions, applications of integration, indeterminate forms, improper integrals, parametric curves, polar coordinates, series and sequences, and applications. The laboratory component of the course emphasizes mathematical modeling, problem solving, and written/oral communication and will require the use of graphing calculators and mathematical software.

    Prerequisite: MTH 240.
    • May 18 - June 27
    • Online



    MTH 485 - Special Topics: Elementary Topology
    3 Credits, Undergraduate


    A study of topics in mathematics of special interest to a specific group of students. MTH 185 does not fulfill the mathematics requirement of the Core Curriculum.

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
    • May 18 - June 27
    • Online
  • Philosophy
    PHL 109 - Issues in Philosophy
    3 credits, Undergraduate

    An introductory course that examines the works of representative philosophers through the ages and their responses to some perennial issues. Includes topics such as faith and reason, theories of knowledge, and ethical behavior. Not open to students enrolled in or with credit in PHL 110.
    • June 8 - July 8
    • 6 - 9 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
    • Main Campus
  • Physics
    PHY 119/219 - College Physics I / General Physics I
    4 Credits, Undergraduate


    An algebra-based study of mechanics: translational and rotational motion, the laws of conservation of energy and momentum, hydrostatics and hydrodynamics, and basic thermodynamics; includes laboratory.

    Prerequisite: MTH 160 or equivalent. Not open to Chemistry majors.
    • June 8 - July 2
    • 8 a.m. – 1:50 p.m., Monday through Friday
    • Main Campus



    PHY 120/220 - College Physics I / General Physics II
    4 Credits, Undergraduate

    An algebra-based study of electricity and magnetism, optics, introductory modern physics, and simple harmonic motion and waves; includes laboratory.

    Prerequisite: MTH 160 or equivalent. Not open to Chemistry majors
    • July 6 - July 31
    • 8 a.m. – 1:50 p.m., Monday through Friday
    • Main Campus
  • Theology
    THL 106 - The Old Testament
    3 Credits, Undergraduate


    A study of the historical prophetic, and sap- iential texts in the Old Testament according to their historical, literary, and theological contexts. Not open to students with credit for THL 105.
    • June 8 - July 29
    • 9 a.m. - 12 noon, Monday, Wednesday
    • Main Campus


    THL 225 - Intro to Christian Theology
    3 Credits, Undergraduate


    This course introduces students to the academic discipline of Theology. In addition to providing an overview of Christian teachings from a Roman Catholic perspective, it engages students in the processes of theological reflection, discourse, and research. Not open for students with credit in THL 113.
    • June 9 - July 30
    • 9 a.m. - 12 noon, Tuesday, Thursday
    • Main Campus

Graduate Courses

  • Business Administration (MBA)
    MBA 502 - Survey of Business Statistics
    1 Credit, Graduate


    Basic statistical skills for advanced work in the functional areas of business administration. The module will review topics such as descriptive statistics (mean, median, mode), probability, distributions, sampling, and estimation.
    • June 8 - July 2
    • Online


    MBA 503 - Survey of Economics
    1 Credit, Graduate


    An introductory review of economic theory and current economic events. The module examines economic problems associated with effective managerial and decision-making.
    • July 6 - August 1
    • Online


    MBA 504 - Survey of Accounting
    1 Credit, Graduate


    The course surveys the acquisition, analysis, and reporting of accounting information from the perspective of effective management decision- making. It also touches on the planning and control responsibilities of practicing managers.
    • June 8 - July 2
    • Online


    MBA 505 - Survey of Finance
    1 Credit, Graduate


    The module examines the fundamentals of financial administration emphasizing the development of the issues and techniques involved in the cost of capital, capital budgeting, working capital management, and long-term sources and uses of funds.
    • July 6 - August 1
    • Online


    MBA 510 - Management Skills Portfolio
    3 Credits, Undergraduate/Graduate

    This is an integrated course focusing on personal skill and management competency assessment and development. This course utilizes a set of assessment instruments and techniques to help students identify areas for personal development and growth. The assessment process culminates in the creation of a personal development plan that will be revisited in the final course of each graduate business program in order to determine progress and recast an updated plan.

    Additionally, the course contains multiple skill modules addressing capabilities relevant to academic success in any business graduate program. Skills addressed include team, writing, creativity research, presentations, project management, software, and citation skills. Not open to students who have completed BUS 510.
    • June 5 - August 1
    • Online


    MBA 540 - Management of Information Systems
    3 Credits, Undergraduate/Graduate

    This course examines the use of information systems and their impact on service business processes. The course covers the management of the flow of information and services across the information the information systems user-producer interface. The course looks at the users of information systems and at the producers of information systems. The course approaches such topics as systems development, assessment of systems performance, and discussion of trends in the corporate application of developing technology from a managerial perspective. Not open to students who have completed BUS 545.
    • June 5 - August 1
    • Online


    MBA 550 - Global Business Enterprises & Trade Issues
    3 Credits, Undergraduate/Graduate

    This course addresses important issues pertaining to cross-border operations and practices of multi-national enterprises as well as trade issues between nation states. Cultural, political, environmental, fair labor practices, regional integration and trade restrictions issues all impinge upon management decisions. This course integrates basic trade theories underpinning multinational business with case studies that illustrate real world applicability of these theories and making them more transparent to the students. It also incorporates the ethical dilemma and the social responsibility concerns faced by multinational corporations in their international operations. Not open to students who have completed BUS 660.
    • June 5 - August 1
    • Online


    MBA 570 - Quantitative Business Analysis
    3 Credits, Undergraduate/Graduate

    This course deals with rational applications to decision making through the study of quantitative models. It emphasizes analysis of data, interpretation of model results, and their implications for managerial decisions. Topics include decision analysis, probability relations and distributions, regression models and forecasting, project analysis, queuing, and linear programming. Not open to students who have completed BUS 570.
    • June 8 - July 27
    • 6 - 9 p.m., Monday
    • Main Campus


    MBA 620 - Marketing Management
    3 Credits, Graduate

    This course focuses on the managing the marketing function. The emphasis is on the nature and scope of the marketing manager's responsibilities and on marketing decision-making. Topics include market and environmental analysis, marketing planning, the development and management of marketing programs. Not open to students who have completed BUS 620.
    • June 9 - July 28
    • 6 - 9 p.m., Tuesday
    • Main Campus

     

    MBA 622 - Conflict Management & Negotiation Strategies for Leaders
    3 Credits, Graduate

    Students will study the techniques necessary to break impasse and in an effort to come to resolution in the areas of conflict and negotiation. Skills include how to create an atmosphere that fosters conflict as an impetus for organizational learning and growth. Additionally, the course will focus on conflict resolution in the leadership roles that emphasizes how to avoid zero-sum alternatives and solutions. Further exploration into negotiation, will enhance the student's ability to conduct difficult conversations and mediate "win-win" situations. This course moves students to a greater competence level in both the theory and techniques of conflict management and negotiation.
    • June 5 - August 1
    • Online


    MBA 630 - Accounting for Managers
    3 Credits, Graduate

    The emphasis of this course is to provide a framework to learners so that they may demonstrate the ability to analyze the financial statements of an organization operating in our society and to understand how financial information can be used in the management, planning, control, and decision-making process. This course offers methods for determining the optimal volume and composition of firm assets, liabilities, and equity. This course will also cover theories and practices of capital budgeting and financing of assets. Not open to students who have completed BUS 630.
    • June 10 - July 29
    • 6 - 9 p.m., Wednesday
    • Main Campus


    MBA 650 - Managerial Finance
    3 Credits, Graduate

    This course is a study of traditional and contemp- orary theories of finance as applied to the solution of management problems identified in sel- ected cases. The focus of the applications activity is on policy formulations and decision making under conditions of uncertainty. The course builds upon concepts from financial manage- ment and managerial accounting courses. This course offers methods for determining the optimal volume and composition of firm assest, liabilities and equity. The theories and practices of capital budgeting and financing of assets are emphasized.
    • June 5 - August 1
    • Online

    MBA 680 - Leadership & Change Management
    3 Credits, Graduate

    This course focuses on an exploration of the models, perspectives, competencies and tools related to providing leadership in changing environments. Students will assess their abilities in a variety of core leadership components including individual leadership traits, emotional intelligence, and change mangagement skills. An individual leadership development plan will be constructed utilizing course readings, skill assessment tools and case studies. Not open to students with crdit for MBA 725 or BUS 725.
    • June 8 - July 27
    • 6 - 9 p.m., Monday
    • Main Campus
  • Education
    EDU 505 - Technology & Learning
    3 Credits, Graduate


    This course is designed to investigate the issues, concepts, and philosophical considerations that support the integration of technology in education in the digital age. Emphasis will be on the effective integration of appropriate technology as tools for teaching and learning. Universal design for learning (UDL) principles will be applied in teaching and assessing for student learning (Higher Education Opportunity Act, 2008).

    The development of new teaching strategies and resources will be aligned with intent of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act, IDEA (1990, 1997, 2004), National Education Technology Plan (2005), legislative and judicial mandates, and professional, state and national standards. This course is designed to prepare teachers with the knowledge, skills and dispositions to integrate technology to teach every student in the 21st Century.
    • June 1 - July 24
    • Online


    EDU 518 - Content Area Reading & Writing
    3 Credits, Graduate


    This course examines principles, strategies and methodologies that are designed to improve student achievement in the content area. Research theory, and implications for instruction and technology will be examined and reviewed.

    Topics include purposes and types of reading; content reading, learning design and delivery and methods of assessing reading strategies and skills in student-centered reading instruction. This course contains 25 hours of clinical field experience.
    • May 18 - July 10
    • Online


    EDU 520 - Non-Fiction Literature, Common Core & the Teaching of Reading 
    3 Credits, Graduate


    The focus of this course is to explore non-fiction texts to examine and discuss how children learn to read using non-fiction. This course will review and evaluate the different types of non-fiction texts children, adolescents, and adults encounter on an everyday basis. The course will also emphasize the connection between the Common Core Standards and informational texts.

    Further, this course will investigate how children and adolescents analyze, synthesize, apply and integrate non-fiction text into their daily lives. Additionally, this course addresses theories and practices of the social and political dimensions of literacy instruction, particularly the use of non-fiction text in everyday life. This course includes 25 hours of field experience.
    • June 1 - July 24
    • Online


    EDU 535OL - Developing a Deeper Understanding of Leadership
    3 Credits, Graduate


    This course will offer teachers in public and private schools the opportunity to examine their own leadership styles and beliefs, while learning more about leadership in general, and school leadership, specifically.
    • June 1 - July 24
    • Online


    EDU 535 - Developing a Deeper Understanding of Leadership
    3 Credits, Graduate


    This course will offer teachers in public and private schools the opportunity to examine their own leadership styles and beliefs, while learning more about leadership in general, and school leadership, specifically.
    • June 8 - June 12
    • 8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday
    • Main Campus


    EDU 540 - Change: School Leadership for Continuous Improvement
    3 Credits, Graduate


    This course will aid in the understanding and knowledge of how one can lead a school through a continuous improvement process. The student will examine "turnaround programs," the value of university-district partnerships and visionary restructuring for school improvement. The course will offer a change process, continuous improvement strategies, the need for leadership teams, while also examining processes that can deeply impact the high-need school buildings.
    • June 15 - June 26
    • 8:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m., Monday through Friday
    • Main Campus

    EDU 542 - Leading Instructional Learning
    3 Credits, Graduate


    This course will examine curriculum leadership on a macro-scale, as well as examining how best to implement curricular change, work with curriculum (mapping) coverages. This class will not look at the specific curriculum, but how to lead departments, grades, and schools in the implementation of a cohesive curriculum. It will also look at how to integrate inclusion and the special education challenges into the curriculum.

    • June 1 - July 24
    • Online

    EDU 545 - School Law & Personnel Services
    3 Credits, Graduate


    This course will examine curriculum leadership on a macro-scale, as well as examining how best to implement curricular change, work with curriculum (mapping) coverages. This class will not look at the specific curriculum, but how to lead departments, grades, and schools in the implementation of a cohesive curriculum. It will also look at how to integrate inclusion and the special education challenges into the curriculum.

    • June 1 - July 24, 5 - 8 p.m., Monday (plus one Tuesday)
    • Main Campus & Online


    EDU 560 - Research Methods in Education
    3 Credits, Graduate


    This course will focus on basic types of research conducted in education, including both quantitative and qualitative, as well as pro- cedures for analyzing data for each type of research. Students will be able to identify and understand good research and to develop action research to move theory to practice.

    • May 18 - July 10
    • Online

    EDU 566 - Teaching Mathematics & Science in the Intermediate Grades
    3 Credits, Graduate


    The purpose of this course is to familiarize teachers with mathematics and science curricula for children in the intermediate grades (4-5) and with instructional techniques appropriate for the delivery of the curricula. Course content is closely aligned with recommendations of authorities and national organizations, with a solid foundation in the Ohio Academic Content Standards for Mathematics and Science.

    The course is designed to extend the teacher's understanding of mathematics and science content and methodology so that mathematics and science instruction is seen in terms of active children, making appropriate use of technology in learning mathematics and science as relevant and coherent bodies of knowledge that relate to diverse cultures.

    • June 1 - July 24
    • Online


    EDU 567 - Teaching Language Arts & Social Studies in the Intermediate Grades
    3 Credits, Graduate


    The focus of this course is to explore the integration of the language arts and social studies particularly the content standards related to 4th and 5th grades. Topics include both the Ohio Content Standards for Language Arts and Social Studies as well as National Council for the Social Studies Curriculum Standards and the Standards for English Language Arts. Emphasis will be on effective pedagogy for engaged teaching and learning.
    • June 1 - July 24
    • Online


    EDU 568 - Teaching & Learning in the Intermediate Grades
    3 Credits, Graduate


    The purpose of this course is to familiarize teachers with the developmental needs of the intermediate age group, the organizational structures of the elementary/middle grades and standards set by the National Middle School Association. Focus is placed on understanding the diversity of the students and ways of supporting the students through current research and best practices.
    • June 1 - July 24
    • Online


    EDU 570 - School Business, Finance & Allocation of Resources 
    3 Credits, Graduate


    The purpose of this course is to familiarize teachers with the developmental needs of the intermediate age group, the organizational structures of the elementary/middle grades and standards set by the National Middle School Association. Focus is placed on understanding the diversity of the students and ways of supporting the students through current research and best practices.
    • June 2 - July 24
    • 5 - 8 p.m., Wednesday (plus one Tuesday)
    • Main Campus & Online


    EDU 610 - Reading in the Social Setting
    3 Credits, Graduate

    This course addresses theories and practices of the social and political dimensions of literacy instruction. The course introduces students to key issues and trends in the field such as equity and diversity, social action and change, new media and technology as they relate to literacy as a social practice. This course will center on practicing teachers examination of multimodality and multiliteracy practices for language/literacy teaching and learning. The course includes 25 hours of field experience.
    • June 1 - July 24
    • Online
  • English
    ENG 516 - British Literature From 1800
    3 Credits, Graduate


    This course covers the major canonical authors and literary movements of England in the Romantic period, the Victorian era, the Modern Age, and beyond. Attention is also given to non-canonical writers, including women and other historically under-represented authors. The history of English-its major changes, dialects, and usage during these periods-is continued.

    Prerequisite: ENG 514 Graduate Writing & Research.
    • June 8 - July 31
    • Online


    ENG 520 - American Literature
    3 Credits, Graduate


    This course covers the major canonical authors and literary movements of America, from pre-Revolutionary writers to the present. Attention is also given to non-canonical writers, including women and other historically under-represented authors in a variety of genres, including fiction, poetry, and drama, as well as non-fiction (letters, essays, slave narratives, and other historical documents). 

    Prerequisite: ENG 514 Graduate Writing & Research. 
    • June 8 - July 31
    • Online


    ENG 575 - World Literature
    3 Credits, Graduate


    This course examines classic and/or contemporary texts of world literature in translation, emphasizing not only the analysis of the literature and the culture from which it comes, but also the increasingly globalized nature of literature itself. Each course will have a particular focus or theme. 

    Prerequisite: ENG 514 Graduate Writing & Research. Not open to student with credit for ENG/LST 605
    • June 8 - July 31
    • Online
  • Medical Practice Management
    MPM 600 - Practicum
    1 Credit, Graduate


    This is a practicum placement with a health organization that enables the student to develop practical skills essential for the effective management of a medical/physician practice or the management of multiple medical practices. While in the practicum the student will complete at least two reflection papers as stipulated by the faculty supervisor. This is available to students who have not held full-time professional work positions in the medical practice management field and to those with work experience in the field who wish to explore new career options. The practicum placement must be approved by the Program Director or Chair of the Division of Business. Students must have completed a minimum of 12 credit hours prior to taking this course.

     MPM students who want to use this course to meet graduation requirements must complete a minimum of 3 credit hours in MPM 600 or enroll in MPM 720, or another graduate level business course with the program director's approval. One credit hour is equal to 40 clock hours in the organization. International students applying for Curricular Practical Training (CPT) through the international office must be enrolled in MPM 600 for a minimum of one credit hour in the semester. This course may be repeated multiple times with a maximum of 6 credit hours earned.
    • June 10 - July 29
    • 6 - 9 p.m., Wednesday 
    • Main Campus


    MPM 640 - Healthcare Economics
    3 Credits, Graduate


    This course applies economic analysis to decision making in medical practices. It develops an understanding of the healthcare system and the markets for healthcare services. Students will study important techniques essential for the effective management of a medical practice and exploration of new business opportunities. These include demand and supply analysis, benefit and cost analysis, incentive analysis, and profit and market analysis.
    • June 8 - July 27
    • 6 - 9 p.m., Monday
    • Main Campus


    MPM 720 - Independent Project
    3 Credits, Graduate


    This is an independent research project in healthcare. The project design, expected outcomes, requirements and completion date must be determined in collaboration with a faculty member who has agreed to supervise the project. A proposal written by the student must be approved by the Program Director or Chair of the Division of Business. 
    • June 10 - July 29
    • 6 - 9 p.m., Wednesday
    • Main Campus
  • Sport Management
    SPM 720 - Sport Management Comprehensive Project
    3 Credits, Graduate


    This course is a faculty directed capstone project, where the student develops and implements an applied project in sport. May be repeated up to six credits. Not open to students with credit for SPM 730. 
    • June 5 - August 1
    • Directed study days to be announced
  • Theology
    THL 685 - Special Topic: Theology of Marriage
    3 Credits, Graduate


    A Catholic theology of marriage that covers principles of theological anthropology essential to an understanding of marriage, the nature of conjugal love, marriage in the order of creation, marriage in the Bible, marriage as a sacrament, married spirituality, conjugal morality, and the relationship between the vocations of marriage and consecrated celibacy.
    • June 9 - July 28
    • 9 a.m. - 12 noon, Tuesday
    • Main Campus

  • TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages)
    TSL 540 - Cultural Diversity & Education
    3 Credits, Graduate


    The study of the nature, role and content of culture, especially in relation to education. Topics include major cultural concepts, inter- action between language and culture, and multi- cultural education. Conisderation of ESOL students' cultural identities, language and literacy development, and academic achievement. Attention is paid to English instruction in the US, including relevant terminology, demographics, and history; legal and ethical issues; and TESOL professional development. Includes 20 hours of field experience.
    • June 9 - July 28
    • 6 - 8:50 p.m., Tuesday
    • Main Campus


    TSL 570 - Resources for ESOL & Content Instruction
    3 Credits, Graduate


    Selection, creation, and use of standards-based materials, resources, and technologies. Attention to culture, language proficiency, and age of ESOL learners. Examination of use of various print and non-print resources, audiovisual materials, and technological tools.

    Prerequisite: TSL 500-540.
    • June 10 - July 29
    • 6 - 8:50 p.m., Wednesday
    • Main Campus


    TSL 600 - Research Project
    3 Credits, Graduate


    In addition to completing teaching/learning port- folios that they have developed in the program, candidates will complete the project that they proposed in TSL 550, Research Methods in TESOL. Candidates will summarize research related to their topics, describe their methodology, conduct research, present their findings, and identify outlets for their research.

    Prerequisites: TSL 500-540.
    • June 11 - July 30
    • 6 - 8:50 p.m., Thursday
    • Main Campus