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Course offerings listed below may vary from year to year based on course availability. For the most up-to-date courses, course requirements and descriptions, always refer to the current University Catalog. View the current Catalog here.

COM 105 - Public Speaking
3 Credits
A study of the principles and processes of oral communication with emphasis on speech design and delivery. Vocal and linguistic skills will be practiced. Critical thought will be developed through analysis of current and historical speeches.


COM 132 - Interpersonal Communication
3 Credits
Focus on communication theories as applied to interpersonal relationships. Topics such as perception, diversity, nonverbal communication, language, and self-disclosure are examined using readings, in-class exercises, and analysis of actual situations. This course fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement.


EDU 112 - Introduction to Teaching: Adolescence to Young Adult
3 Credits
This introduction to teaching includes supervised early experience of 60 hours in grades 7-12 (AYA) or P-12 (Art) classroom. The exploratory contact with various school activities is designed to help the student clarify the decision to become a member of the teaching profession. 

Not open to students with credit for EDU 115 and EDU 346A.


EDU 120 - Teaching Reading Through Literature for Children & Young Adults
3 Credits
The techniques and methods of teaching reading through the use of literature for pre-school age through young adulthood will be explored. Emphasis is on genres; author and illustrator studies; the inter-relationship of reading, writing, listening, and speaking; multicultural and international publications; and historical and contemporary publishing trends.

Students should develop an appreciation for children’s literature as they select, interpret, discuss, and formulate strategies for using quality books with children. Includes service-learning hours.


EDU 220 - Educational Psychology
3 Credits 
A research based study of human growth and development as related to teaching and learning. A study of language acquisition, multiple intelligence, learning styles, student diversity and exceptionality, motivation and discipline, learning environments and various forms of assessment/evaluation. Includes field experience of a minimum of 10 hours. 

Prerequisites: EDU 105 or 112 or equivalent.


EDU 314 - Content Area Reading
3 Credits
An examination of programs and methods in reading with a focus on theory and current research in comprehension, the writing process, critical thinking and content area reading. Emphasis is placed on reading to learn with meaning-based strategies that help students construct meaning and expand thinking. Informal assessment of educational materials for appropriate content reading levels and adaptation of content reading materials is highlighted. 


EDU 346 - Adolescent to Young Adult & Multi-Age Methods
3 Credits 
A study and practice of the art and the science of teaching as informed by state standards for teacher licensure including: secondary curricula, unit/lesson planning, instructional strategies, learning environments, motivation, classroom management, collaboration, student diversity and exceptionality, assessment/evaluation, the integration of technology in teaching and learning, and professionalism. Includes a minimum of 30 hours of field experience. 

Prerequisite: Admission to the Education Division, EDU 220 or consent of the instructor/advisor. May be a co-requisite with EDU 410. Please see EDU 410 course description for details.


EDU 355 - Adolescent to Young Adult Language Arts Teaching Methods
3 Credits
This course prepares the language arts teacher education candidate to teach language arts to adolescent and young adults in grades 7-12, based on the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) Standards. Through a study and application of the structure of language arts knowledge and the pedagogy of language arts, the teacher education candidate will be prepared in the art and science of teaching English and Communications with emphasis on current research, curricular designs, best practices and strategies, and assessment and evaluation techniques appropriate to the language arts.

Students will understand the interconnectedness of the language arts and the relationship of the language arts to related disciplines. 

Includes a minimum of 30 hours of field experience. May be a co-requisite with EDU 410. Please see EDU 410 course description for details.


EDU 379A - CORE: Principles of Education
3 Credits
Justice is part of our schools. Or, is it? This course in educational foundations will develop from diverse perspectives an understanding of the historical, sociological, and philosophical roots of education as they are impacted by justice and the question “how shall we live.” Current educational issues and developments will structure the course as we look at how education became an institution and why it must continue to grow and change. 

Prerequisite: CORE 179 or appropriate transfer status; ENG 102 or ENG 111. Not open to students with credit in EDU 348A. This course fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement.


EDU 410 - Assessment & Technology in Teaching & Learning
3 Credits
This course is designed to prepare undergraduate teacher candidates in all licensure programs with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to effectively integrate technology in teaching for student learning and in designing assessment for student learning. Candidates will understand and apply this knowledge during field experiences to fulfill Ohio mandates for value added student growth measures, new innovative teacher assessment measures (e.g. edTPA) and national legislative and judicial mandates (e.g. Higher Education Opportunity Act, 2008; IDEA, 2004; NCLB, 2001) aligned with the professional, local, state, and national standards including the common core standards.

Candidates will understand and apply the transformational concepts of universal design for learning (UDL) principles and develop technological, pedagogical content knowledge (TPACK) to teach the full spectrum of students in diverse classrooms in the 21st century. 

Co-requisites: 

  • Adolescent & Young Adult and Multi-Age Program - one methods course from: EDU 346, EDU 353, 354, 355, MTH 352, ART 337
  • Middle Childhood Program - one methods course from: EDU 347, EDU 349a, EDU 349b, EDU 349c
  • Intervention Specialists Program - one methods course from: EDU 330, EDU 331, EDU 350, EDU 351
  • Early Childhood Program - two methods courses from: EDU 339, EDU 333a, EDU 333b, EDU 333c

 

EDU 487 - Supervised Teaching: Adolescence to Young Adult or Multi-Age
12 Credits
Full-time, full-semester supervised student teaching in the student's area of licensure. The student teacher assumes responsibility for the full teaching load of the cooperating teacher including planning, teaching, evaluating and managing/disciplining, and teacher duties. 

Prerequisites: EDU 346 and Content Methods Course: EDU 353, EDU 354, EDU 355, MTH 352, or ART 337; and EDU 379A. Co-requisite: EDU 488 or equivalent.


EDU 488 - Teaching Seminar: Adolescent to Young Adult or Multi-Age
1 Credit
A discussion of various professional education topics and a sharing of teaching experiences that assist the student in the transition from student to professional teacher. The Program Completion Portfolio is prepared and presented during EDU 488.

Co-requisite: EDU 487. 


ENG 205 - Literary Research Methods
3 Credits
The course provides an introduction to literary research methods, bibliography, literary terminology, and research writing. Students will learn to use the major research tools (online databases, search engines, and in-house library resources) in literary studies and apply the skills to selected literary works. Students will also learn how to find and analyze primary and secondary sources and incorporate findings into their writing. The course is designed to prepare students for research assignments in future English courses. 

This course does not fulfill the literature requirement for the Core.


ENG 215A - Survey of British Literature I
3 Credits
Surveys predominantly the traditional, canonical writers of England of the Anglo-Saxon period, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Enlightenment. The course emphasizes historical and cultural influences on writers such as the Beowulf poet, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Spenser, Milton, Pope, Swift, and Samuel Johnson. The history of English—its dialects and levels of usage—is also covered. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.


ENG 215B - Survey of British Literature II
3 Credits
Surveys the major writers of England from the Romantic and Victorian periods and through the twentieth century. The course emphasizes historical and cultural influences on writers such as Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, George Eliot, Arnold, Browning, Joyce, Eliot, and Woolf. The history of English—its dialects and levels of usage—is also covered. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.


ENG 216 - Survey of American Literature 
3 Credits
Surveys the major writers of the United States from colonial times through the twentieth century. The course emphasizes historical and cultural influences on writers such as Emerson, Whitman, Melville, Twain, and Faulkner. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.


ENG 220 - Professional Writing
3 Credits
A study of the various forms of business and technical writing: resumes, correspondence, proposals, case studies, and reports. Especially useful for liberal arts majors who want to make themselves more marketable in their careers and for those interested in professional writing. Grammar and language acquisition emphasized. Non-print media also included. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. Not open to students with credit in BUS 120. This course does not fulfill the literature requirement.


ENG 322 - Creative Writing
3 Credits
This course focuses on the means of presentation, production, and publication methods and options for writers. Grammar and language acquisition emphasized. Non-print media also included. Does not fulfill the literature requirement. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111 or consent of instructor.


ENG 326 - The Art of the Essay
3 Credits
This course provides extensive opportunities for experienced writers to develop advanced stylistic techniques essential to good writing. The focus ranges from microscopic (nuances in grammar) to macroscopic (writing theory), as well as the means by which we read and write for different purposes. Non-print media also included. Recommended for those interested in professional writing, teaching, and especially for the English major planning graduate study. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. Does not fulfill the literature requirement.


ENG 342 - African Literature
3 Credits
A general survey of African literature including the oral traditions that formed its background. Students will examine various forms of African artistic expression including oral literature, short story, and novels. Students will read literary texts originally written in English or in English translation. Reading of primary texts will be supplemented with critical essays and documentary films. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. This course fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement.


ENG 343 - The Literature of American Diversity
3 Credits
A study of literary works and authors not usually included in the traditional canon because of race, ethnic background, gender, age, or other factors. The class includes works by the minority cultures of African-American, Native American, Asian-American, and Hispanic-American as well as other groups left outside the mainstream of the American experience. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. This course fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement.


ENG 348G - Film & Literature
3 Credits
By reading and analyzing literature in relationship to film, filming techniques, and film's history, this course will explore the often complex and frequently competitive relationship between film and literature. Students analyze print and non-print materials, while also creating print and non-print projects. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.


ENG 357 - World Literature
3 Credits
A study of selected masterpieces, in English translation, by international authors whose native language is not English. There will be an exploration of interplay between English-language and other language literatures, discussion of the place of translation, analysis of universal motifs, and exposure to authors not widely read in the United States. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. This course fulfills the diversity, global, and multicultural requirement.


ENG 450 - Novels
3 Credits
A study in the forms, techniques, and historical evolution of the novel through the discussion of a particular theme, author, group of authors, or literary movement. A particular course’s focus will be reflected in its title when it is offered. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. May be repeated up to six credits on different topics.


ENG 451 - Women's Literature
3 Credits
Explores the roles women have played in the history of literature and explores the contributions of female artists. The course also addresses issues of empowerment, marginalization, and voice. Some sections may include a service-learning component. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.


ENG 452 - Short Stories
3 Credits
A study in the forms, techniques, and historical evolution of the short story as a literary genre through the discussion of authors, themes, and literary movements. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111.


ENG 455 - Poetry
3 Credits
A study in the forms, techniques, and historical evolution of poetry through the discussion of a particular theme, author, group of authors, or literary movement. The course’s focus will be reflected in the course titles in the course offering bulletins. 

Prerequisites: ENG 110-111 or 101-102. May be repeated up to six credits on different topics.


ENG 456 - Drama
3 Credits
A study in the forms techniques and historical evolution of drama through the discussion of a particular theme, author, group of authors, or literary movement. The course’s focus will be reflected in the course titles in the course offering bulletins. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. May be repeated up to six credits on different topics.


ENG 460 - The Age of Chaucer
3 Credits
A study of Chaucer and other major writers of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. 


ENG 463 - The Age of Shakespeare
3 Credits
A study of the major works of Shakespeare and other dramatists from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. This course will focus on various genres. 

Prerequisites: ENG 101-102 or 110-111. 


ENG 479 - CORE: Literature Theory/Practice
3 Credits
This course offers students the opportunity to develop their professional, career, writing, and analytic skills through a variety of assignments. Students will not only read great works of literature, they will also learn about career development and the world of literary theory in order to better prepare them for the more advanced research activities of graduate and professional schools.

The course is organized around issues regarding literature and the acquisition of knowledge. How do we know what we know? What is art? Who determines the canon and/or a great work of art? What is literary theory and interpretation? And, importantly, how have these questions been answered differently throughout the ages. 

The literature readings have been chosen to illustrate the close relationship, rather than the divisions, between literature and theory. In the end, the course asks students to 1) determine the truths they have learned about literature, and 2) examine how they know or came to know these truths.

Prerequisites: Completion of junior core seminar, junior status, or permission of instructor and ENG 205.